Always have more than one toothbrush

Always have more than one toothbrush

In instances like this – a spare toothbrush can be handy! When you next visit us, feel free to ask for a free toothbrush that is best suited for your teeth and gums. There are no excuses for not complying with your dental routine now!...
Antibacterial 3D printed tooth

Antibacterial 3D printed tooth

Dentistry is getting even more exciting with the advent of 3D printing and evolving materials. Lost a tooth? A new 3D-printed replacement might protect against future cavities. Published earlier this month by researchers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, “3D-Printable Antimicrobial Composite Resins” details a tooth made from materials that kill bacteria on contact. Read more …. Photo by...
Rebuilding bone in dentistry

Rebuilding bone in dentistry

I need to “grow” more bone before implant treatment, how do dentists rebuild bone? Thanks to research and technology, bone regeneration for implant dentistry is a usual and routine procedure in oral surgery. Understanding the principles of wound healing now allows for regeneration of bone to occur using a variety of techniques. Most include cutting through the gum to expose the bone and then augmenting the existing (insufficient) bone by adding bone grafting materials to it. Hence the name “bone grafting”. Grafting materials include your own bone (sourced from a secondary site), cadaver bone, bovine bone, or synthetic bone. All of these grafting materials have been processed so that they are inert and certified safe for human use. Your body will then grow its own bone around the graft, eventually replacing volume. Healing of the grafted material can be enhanced by using membranes which cover the grafts to promote and enhance healing. See more about how we do our bone grafts...
The hidden cost of missing molars

The hidden cost of missing molars

“I’m only missing a back tooth, you can’t even see it!” The real problem with tooth loss isn’t just aesthetics, it’s the subsequent bone loss. The alveolar bone, which surrounds the teeth, requires regular stimulation (piezoelectric effect – tiny stresses transmitted via the tooth) in order to stay healthy. Without such stimulation the bone will gradually be lost. It is a process of the body to take bone from where it’s not ‘needed’ to where it is needed. Studies have proven that a lost tooth can result in a 25% decrease in bone width in the first year alone, and will continue to decrease in subsequent years. As bone loses width and height, gum tissue also gradually decreases. Ability to chew and to speak can be impaired. The more teeth lost, the more function is lost. Bite collapse can occur when only some of the back teeth, which support the height of the face, are missing. This can cause the front teeth to be more stressed, squashed or pushed forward. Severe bone loss will also result in uncomfortable dentures or the inability to wear one at all. Fortunately, there is way to keep tooth loss from becoming bone loss: it’s the dental implant. Because the implant actually becomes fused to the living bone, it will continue to stimulate the bone and prevent loss. Molars, in fact, are usually the first teeth to be lost. Dealing with that first missing molar will help maintain the integrity of the jaw and the structures they support. Read here for an in-depth discussion on the benefits of dental implants and facial collapse. Photo...
New crown sensitivity

New crown sensitivity

I just had a crown inserted and my tooth feels sensitive, what can I do? Yay, you have a new crown, but after a day that tooth starts to feel sensitive. Sensitivity vary from person-to-person so this can be a difficult question to answer unless you consult the dentist who placed your crown. It is helpful if you have identified as many of the facts and/or triggers for any symptoms you have. For example, are your teeth sensitive to temperature, taste, touch, pressure, or biting a certain way? It may be as simple as adjusting a minor high spot when you bite. It may even be the adjoining tooth that is sensitive. If you are having a cold, hayfever allergies or sinusitis, it may be referred pain due to the pressure in the sinuses. Some sensitivity is normal after a crown as the tooth settles down; however, increasing sensitivity or pain after a week or more warrants a follow up visit to your dentist to re-adjust and rule out newly developed...