Antibacterial 3D printed tooth

Antibacterial 3D printed tooth

Dentistry is getting even more exciting with the advent of 3D printing and evolving materials. Lost a tooth? A new 3D-printed replacement might protect against future cavities. Published earlier this month by researchers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, “3D-Printable Antimicrobial Composite Resins” details a tooth made from materials that kill bacteria on contact. Read more …. Photo by...
Rebuilding bone in dentistry

Rebuilding bone in dentistry

I need to “grow” more bone before implant treatment, how do dentists rebuild bone? Thanks to research and technology, bone regeneration for implant dentistry is a usual and routine procedure in oral surgery. Understanding the principles of wound healing now allows for regeneration of bone to occur using a variety of techniques. Most include cutting through the gum to expose the bone and then augmenting the existing (insufficient) bone by adding bone grafting materials to it. Hence the name “bone grafting”. Grafting materials include your own bone (sourced from a secondary site), cadaver bone, bovine bone, or synthetic bone. All of these grafting materials have been processed so that they are inert and certified safe for human use. Your body will then grow its own bone around the graft, eventually replacing volume. Healing of the grafted material can be enhanced by using membranes which cover the grafts to promote and enhance healing. See more about how we do our bone grafts...
The hidden cost of missing molars

The hidden cost of missing molars

“I’m only missing a back tooth, you can’t even see it!” The real problem with tooth loss isn’t just aesthetics, it’s the subsequent bone loss. The alveolar bone, which surrounds the teeth, requires regular stimulation (piezoelectric effect – tiny stresses transmitted via the tooth) in order to stay healthy. Without such stimulation the bone will gradually be lost. It is a process of the body to take bone from where it’s not ‘needed’ to where it is needed. Studies have proven that a lost tooth can result in a 25% decrease in bone width in the first year alone, and will continue to decrease in subsequent years. As bone loses width and height, gum tissue also gradually decreases. Ability to chew and to speak can be impaired. The more teeth lost, the more function is lost. Bite collapse can occur when only some of the back teeth, which support the height of the face, are missing. This can cause the front teeth to be more stressed, squashed or pushed forward. Severe bone loss will also result in uncomfortable dentures or the inability to wear one at all. Fortunately, there is way to keep tooth loss from becoming bone loss: it’s the dental implant. Because the implant actually becomes fused to the living bone, it will continue to stimulate the bone and prevent loss. Molars, in fact, are usually the first teeth to be lost. Dealing with that first missing molar will help maintain the integrity of the jaw and the structures they support. Read here for an in-depth discussion on the benefits of dental implants and facial collapse. Photo...
CEREC technology makes instant crown for a lioness

CEREC technology makes instant crown for a lioness

Ever wanted a new tooth, but don’t want to wait weeks to return to the dentist’s chair? Well neither did Naomi, a 12 year old lioness in Ree Park Safari, Denmark. She had a problematic canine which required a root canal and a crown. CEREC technology allowed this procedure to be done in minimal time, and in one single procedure. (Come on, which lion really wants to go back for that second appointment?) Importantly, it saved her from having a second round of anaesthesia – had it have been a conventional two-visit restoration. Our patients too, can benefit from this technology here and now. Instead of waiting for 1-3 weeks for a new tooth to be created by the dental lab, patients can have their new tooth in one visit, one procedure. CEREC is “Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics”, or “CEramic REConstruction”, using CAD/CAM (computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing) technology. For those who don’t like injections, CEREC technology is ideal. Patients can have the procedure carried out in one session so there is only the need to have one set of injections, if at all. And hands up to those who like impression material? The gaggy expanding-foam-no-more-gaps type substance which comes in an oversized horseshoe-like tray. Be gone! 3-D scanners, like our dentists, are good-looking, slim, quick, precise and very safe. CEREC technology also takes the control of the tooth creation away from the lab, who never sees the patient, and enables the dentist to create the tooth making any minor adjustments without having to send the tooth back and forth to the lab. The 3D...
Stem cells in wisdom teeth

Stem cells in wisdom teeth

Wisdom teeth, they don’t do much – do they? In some people, wisdom teeth are great at growing sideways, well known for sitting on nerves, and usually have a buddy called Abscess. Though most of us would like or need them out at some stage, there is something special about them. The dental pulp of wisdom teeth contain stem cells which researchers claim can be used to make neural, bone and other cells. University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences are demonstrating that stem cells from the dental pulp of wisdom teeth can be ‘coaxed’ to become cells of the eye’s cornea and could one day be used to repair corneal scarring due to infection or injury. Read an article on the research...