Sleep Dentistry

WHAT IS SLEEP DENTISTRY? Sleep dentistry is the use of medication to help relax patients during procedures. Although referred to as ‘sleep’ dentistry, the patient is usually awake, with the exception of those who are under general anesthesia. WHAT IS SLEEP DENTISTRY USED FOR? Commonly offered as an option to patients who experience dental fear, sleep dentistry aids in calming the patient down and putting them into a rested state, where they are comfortable enough for the dentist to work. People with dental fear find it extremely difficult to attend their recommended yearly visits, as even the thought of setting foot in the dentist’s office often causes them to tense with fear. This usually means that dental checkups are missed and overall dental hygiene is neglected, and in most cases, they will not schedule a dental appointment until their tooth pain has become unbearable. The other circumstance, in which sleep dentistry is used for, is oral surgery or complex dental treatments, such as the removal of impacted wisdom teeth, dental implant surgery, or other greatly invasive and/or painful procedures. In these situations, it is easier to put the patient to sleep to eliminate pain and discomfort. HOW DOES SLEEP DENTISTRY WORK? There are different levels and types of sleep dentistry. The strength of sedation differs depending on the procedure or circumstance. The different levels of sedation include: Minimal sedation – the patient is awake but relaxed. Moderate sedation – the patient is awake but heavily sedated to the point of not being able to remember much. Deep sedation – the patient is on the edge of consciousness but can...
Antibacterial 3D printed tooth

Antibacterial 3D printed tooth

Dentistry is getting even more exciting with the advent of 3D printing and evolving materials. Lost a tooth? A new 3D-printed replacement might protect against future cavities. Published earlier this month by researchers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, “3D-Printable Antimicrobial Composite Resins” details a tooth made from materials that kill bacteria on contact. Read more …. Photo by...
“Nightmare Dentist”

“Nightmare Dentist”

Horror Dental stories are a thing of the past. We make sure of it here. However there’s a recent article of some poor kids receiving shoddy and painful “treatment” from a pediatric dentist in Florida. It’s all because if their “Medicaid” (similar to our Medicare) system that pays dentists per procedure – 4 teeth extracted instead of 1 equals 4 x more pay, they bill per item number per tooth so this particular dentist is now in trouble for being greedy. Read the following from kidspot “Nightmare” dentist pulled kids’ teeth out for no reason. And hug your kids tighter… (or tell them you’ll move to Florida if they don’t brush their teeth). Photo by Samuel M....
3D scanned and milled crowns

3D scanned and milled crowns

We have a CEREC machine. What exactly does CEREC stand for? Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics, or CEramic REConstruction. It is essentially a 3D scanner and milling machine which allows a final crown to be made within the day, or hour! CEREC uses CAD-CAM technology. What does CAD-CAM stand for? Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing, technology developed by W. Mörmann and M. Brandestini at the University of Zurich in 1980. That gagging caused by impression material no longer needs to be endured when CAD-CAM is  used. The digital mapping technology of CEREC charts the inside of the patient’s mouth completely accurately and down to the last detail ensures that there is no issues, unlike the conventional and comparatively less accurate dental impression. This technology reduces the amount of follow-up work and time-intensive occlusion adjustment that was often necessary in the past. Not to mention there is no longer a need for temporary crowns when the final product is being milled onsite! Of course, as with everything, some cases may be the exception to the rule. A bridge with many units, for example, will be better made in an external laboratory (Australian of course!). Some case studies from the CEREC website may be found here. You want a crown to be milled into a shape of a teddybear? It can be done! (But we won’t do...