3D scanned and milled crowns

3D scanned and milled crowns

We have a CEREC machine. What exactly does CEREC stand for? Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics, or CEramic REConstruction. It is essentially a 3D scanner and milling machine which allows a final crown to be made within the day, or hour!

CEREC uses CAD-CAM technology. What does CAD-CAM stand for? Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing, technology developed by W. Mörmann and M. Brandestini at the University of Zurich in 1980.

That gagging caused by impression material no longer needs to be endured when CAD-CAM is  used. The digital mapping technology of CEREC charts the inside of the patient’s mouth completely accurately and down to the last detail ensures that there is no issues, unlike the conventional and comparatively less accurate dental impression. This technology reduces the amount of follow-up work and time-intensive occlusion adjustment that was often necessary in the past. Not to mention there is no longer a need for temporary crowns when the final product is being milled onsite!

Of course, as with everything, some cases may be the exception to the rule. A bridge with many units, for example, will be better made in an external laboratory (Australian of course!).

Some case studies from the CEREC website may be found here.

You want a crown to be milled into a shape of a teddybear? It can be done! (But we won’t do it)